Educational equity has been, and continues to be, an essential foundation in our nation’s schools and classrooms — and is critical in math instruction.

Geneva Gay (1988), in her work on designing relevant curricula for diverse learners, posits that a focus on the equitable outputs should lead the development and selection of the inputs, or materials and practices, used in classrooms:

“…the real focus of equity is not sameness of content for all students, but equivalency of effect potential, quality status, and significance of learning opportunities” (p. 329).

From a mathematics perspective, the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics states:


By Mitch Prinstein

Published as a part of a collaboration between McGraw-Hill and Character Lab, where this piece first appeared. Character Lab advances scientific insights that help kids thrive (you can watch a short video here). By connecting researchers with educators, Character Lab seeks to create greater knowledge about the conditions that lead to social, emotional, academic, and physical well-being for young people throughout the country.

“Human beings are social creatures…[S]imply to exist as a normal human being requires interaction with other people.”

— Atul Gawande

Why does social intelligence matter?

Social intelligence is as important as IQ when it comes to happiness, health, and success. Empathetic people…


By Robert W. Maloy, Torrey Trust, Sharon A. Edwards, and Chenyang Xu, University of Massachusetts Amherst

One of our former students, now a middle school social studies teacher, recently told us how he played the song Creo en Mi by Natalia Jimenez as students entered the classroom during one of the first in-person days of school after more than a year of remote learning. A Latina youngster who had rarely said anything in class recognized the song — it was sung by her favorite artist. The rest of the day, the student was actively engaged — participating and communicating about the day’s history topic.

Hearing the teacher’s story, we thought about how before the COVID-19 pandemic…


When children learn and teachers teach, there is more that happens than just the transfer of content knowledge and information. Schools are dynamic and social environments in which both learners and teachers continuously interact, make decisions, and adapt to new circumstances. Developing the skills to successfully navigate school (and later, work and community) environments is a continuous and complex process that requires careful instruction and ongoing support for positive emotional, social, and behavioral skill development. A commonly used term for the development of these specific sets of skills is Social and Emotional Learning, or SEL.


By Angela Duckworth, Character Lab Founder and CEO

Sixty Seconds of Actionable Advice, Based on Science, Brought to you by Character Lab

Published as a part of a collaboration between McGraw-Hill and Character Lab, where this piece first appeared. Character Lab advances scientific insights that help kids thrive (you can watch a short video here). By connecting researchers with educators, Character Lab seeks to create greater knowledge about the conditions that lead to social, emotional, academic, and physical well-being for young people throughout the country.

According to Google Ngram, which tracks the popularity of words and phrases in books, well-being is having a moment.

But the moment, I…


By Issac Scoggins, M.Ed, Teacher at Dallas Independent School District

Educational methods improve student commitment and achievement. Each year, it appears, there is a different approach that is designed (or slightly renamed) and installed as the innovative doctrine of truth that will lead us to the promised land of scholastic achievement and high test scores (Zhao, 2009, 2012).

Educationally, educators are influenced by the levels of Bloom’s Taxonomy. Let us take a peek at the diagram:

The most moderate form of knowledge is to remember. The highest placement of mastery of content is to take that content and design something (Dintersmith, 2018). This product can be as uncomplicated as…


Highlighting Good Reads in Social Studies

If you’re getting this newsletter, then you’re likely a passtionate educator always looking for inspiring stories. We’re passionate about education, too, and about elevating voices that inspire us.

This month, we selected a few stories from our colleagues, partners, and networks all about Social Studies that we loved and hope will inspire you to get creative in the classroom:

Immigration and the Social Studies Classroom

By Dr. Heather Vrana, Associate Professor of History at the University of Florida

<Click to read the blog>


By Dr. Lanette Trowery, Sr. Director of Learning at McGraw Hill School and Margaret Bowman, Academic Designer at McGraw Hill School

Most teachers establish classroom routines during the first few days of school. These routines can help students understand expected behaviors and reduce the cognitive demands of learning new concepts (Leinhardt, Weidman, & Hammond, 1987). Well-practiced and understood classroom routines allow students to maintain focus on their learning without diverting attention to the more general rules and activities (Lampert, Beasley, Ghousseini, Kazemi, & Franke, 2010; Leinhardt et al., 1987).

As defined by Leinhardt and colleagues (1987):

“Routines… are fluid, paired…

McGraw Hill

We apply the science of learning to create innovative educational solutions and content to improve outcomes from K-20 and beyond.

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